Tag Archives: Legal Recruit

Examples of practice online verbal reasoning test questions

In the article below, none of the exemplars have been written by or in collaboration with SHL Direct. Candidates are advised to look at their learning materials carefully. This article is only provided as helpful educational guidance.

In some verbal reasoning test, you are usually provided with a passage of information and required to evaluate a set of statements by selecting one of the following possible answers:

 A – True (The statement follows logically from the information or opinions contained in the passage)

B – False (The statement is logically false from the information or opinions contained in the passage)

C – Cannot Say (Cannot determine whether the statement is true or false without further information)

 

In the example below, you might give your answer to each question by clicking on either A, B or C. You will be told whether your answer is correct or not.

 Example passage:

Over 60 years ago, evolutionary biologist Bernhard Rensch calculated that males are typically the larger sex in big-bodied species such as humans, whereas females outdo them in small-bodied species such as spiders. Now it turns out that many plants obey Rensch’s rule too. Most plants produce both male and female sex organs, but around 7 percent are dioecious, meaning individuals are purely male or female. Recent results provide that female stems also must be large enough to display the fruit and support the animals that spread the pollen or seeds. If metabolism, predators or climate promote the evolution of smaller plants, however, males can shrink because their gametes are smaller.

Examples of questions might be: 

1. Over 80 years ago, Bernard Rensch calculated that males are typically the larger sex in big-bodied species.

CANNOT SAY – the passage says that Bernard Rensch calculated this over 60 years ago, but it is not possible to say from the passage whether he calculated this over 80 years ago.

 2. Around 7% of plants are dioecious, but it is not necessary for female stems to be large enough to display the fruit.

FALSE – whilst the first part of the statement is true according to the passage, the second part of the statement is clearly false, making the entire statement false

Here are example questions with a business theme.

QUESTION

Business schools and venture capital firms have long organised entrepreneur-in-residence programs, tapping seasoned founders for a year or two to mentor students or evaluate potential investments. Now U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services are launching what it calls its own “Entrepreneurs in residence” initiative, to bring business leaders and academics into the agency to meet regularly with officials to improve the visa process. The goal is to “capture the full power of the laws that currently exist to attract talent to spur entrepreneurial growth, to maximize innovation – all for the benefit of our economy and the American worker“, according to agency director Alejandro Mayorkas. Specifics on the push Mayorkas announced today are still being hammered out. Names of the participants and mechanics on how the in-person meetings will work have not been announced yet, though the organiser expects to do so in the next week or so.

Venture capital firms have only recently been involved in organising entrepreneur-in-residence programs.

FALSE. The passage states that venture capital firms have ‘long organised’ such programs.

Names of  the participants and information about how the in-person meetings will work will be announced within the next week.

CANNOT SAY. The passage provides that it is expected that this information will be provided within the next week, but it is not definitely the case that the information will be announced within the next week.

QUESTION

The number of so-called contingent workers has not been measured since 2005, when the Bureau of Labour Statistics last calculated the population. And now that the bureau has requested funding to resume the headcount, the Freelancers Union advocacy group is calling for changes in the way these workers are labeled and how their contribution to the U.S. economy is being measured. In a new policy paper, the Freelancers Union argues that the government is “ignoring a crucial, and growing, segment of the economy that is transforming the U.S. workforce.” The BLS’s ‘contingent work supplement’ was discontinued six years ago due to lack of funding. That year, contingent workers, which the BLS defines as labourers who consider their jobs temporary, made up about 4 percent of total employment.

‘Contingent workers’ are workers for work for an organisation on a non-permanent basis.

CANNOT SAY. This is in fact a valid definition of ‘contingent workers’, but this definition is not provided in the passage.

The BLS’ ‘contingent work supplement’ was discontinued a month ago due to lack of funding.

FALSE. This supplement was discontinued six years ago.

QUESTION

Small business owners are suffering from an economy hurt by reduced consumer
 spending and stagnant growth, according to a new survey by the National Small
 Business Association, a Washington, D.C., trade group. More than one-third say they aren’t confident about the future of their business from a financial perspective. Eighty-eight percent anticipate a recession or flat economy in the next year, an increase from 78 percent six months ago. Forty-five percent expect no growth opportunities in the coming year, up from 40 percent in December. Given the ongoing economic difficulties the U.S. has faced the past three years, small business owners overwhelmingly cited economic uncertainty as the most significant challenge to the future growth and survival of their business, according to the report.

Small business owners are suffering from lack of bank loans.

CANNOT SAY. Consumer spending and stagnant growth are cited as causes of hurt for small business owners, but one cannot exclude the possibility of small business owners suffering from lack of bank loans.

Six months ago 10 percent anticipated a recession or flat economy in the next year.

FALSE. Six months ago 78 percent anticipated a recession or flat economy in the next year.

To access lots of free materials, including factsheets and videos on psychometric tests, please go to the ‘Legal Recruit’ website.

@Legal_Recruit is also on Twitter here.

To take a free online trial, look at the second half of this page.

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Legal Recruit has launched: a new resource for training contract applicants

LegalRecruit provides verbal reasoning and situational judgement practice assessments for the law students who are candidates for vacation schemes or training contracts in corporate law firms.

Useful links are given here:

Home page

Factsheets and videos about online verbal reasoning tests

Have a go at a free online verbal reasoning test (see bottom half of the page)

LegalRecruit is an unique website for busy UK law students to practice online verbal reasoning tests in similar format to the present SHL verbal reasoning tests which are routinely used by corporate firms for recruitment and selection purposes.LegalRecruit is a perfect way for students to learn in a safe, inexpensive, enjoyable environment, for what can be regarded as an important hurdle in training contract and vacation scheme applications.

Applicants are advised to consult the Graduate Recruitment teams of their chosen law firms, and to liaise with them carefully regarding the format of the tests, and how any reasonable adjustments can be implemented (e.g. on grounds of dyslexia, or visual impairment).

Voluntary membership gives you unlimited access to over 500 verbal reasoning and situational judgement questions. You’ll get full explanations to the questions in the form of reports which you can access any time. All scores are also given a normative-reference score, so that you can see where you would be in relation to a graduate-level population. Each test is individually compiled for you in a special way, but always so that you will receive questions from 15 different subject areas. We score the percentiles in “live time”, so that your score is always compared  to the reference population of the total number of people who have taken the Legal Recruit trial test at that particular time.

Legal Recruit is a privately-run entirely independent student venture that is not affiliated to any particular organisations or individuals. The use of this website is entirely at the choice of all users; we aim to provide replies to the email enquiries@legal-recruit.org within 48 hours. Please do email us with suggestions how to make this platform better.

 

 

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Situational Judgement Test : Problem Solving

TO TAKE THE LEGALRECRUIT SITUATIONAL JUDGEMENT TEST OF PROBLEM SOLVING, PLEASE CLICK HERE.

Outstanding problem-solving skills

Do you have the mental agility and intellectual rigour to analyse problems and apply this analysis to develop novel, unexpected solutions?

The problems you face can be large or small, simple or complex, and easy or difficult to solve. Regardless of the nature of the problems, a fundamental part of every trainee lawyer’s role is finding ways to solve them. So, being a confident problem solver will really important to your success a trainee lawyer.

Much of that confidence comes from having a good process to use when approaching a problem. There are various methodologies which you could use to improve your ‘problem solving’ ability: the ‘Mindtools’ website http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMC_00.htm. With a consistent method, you can solve problems quickly and effectively. Without one, your solutions may be ineffective, or you’ll get stuck and do nothing, with sometimes painful consequences.

There are four basic steps in problem solving:

1.            Defining the problem.

2.            Generating alternatives.

3.            Evaluating and selecting alternatives.

4.            Implementing solutions.

Steps 2 to 4 of this process are covered in depth in other areas of Mind Tools. For these, see our sections on Creativity for step 2 (generating alternatives); Decision Making for step 3 (evaluating and selecting alternatives); and Project Management for step 4 (implementing solutions).

Proactive mindset

Are you naturally inquisitive with an openness to new ideas and the initiative to turn them into practical results? Initiative is often misunderstood because it is simply not about meeting performance goals or targets; it’s often about going the extra mile. Initiative may be about identifying a need and championing a solution for the benefit of the law firm, without being asked to do so. Initiative involves a sense of responsibility for the company’s well-being and a few guiding principles. Initiative is about taking steps to make the law firm better, and not about wasting time tackling unimportant matters. To make the distinction, try determining the impact a certain action would make on your team’s performance, the company’s bottom-line or the company’s long-term vision. An excellent, friendly, article on showing initiative is here, http://uk.askmen.com/money/professional_100/137_professional_life.html.

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Competences and the situational judgement tests for corporate law firms

Law firms tend to have a very clear idea what they’re looking for. These are called “competences“. ‘Situational judgement tests’ look at competencies.

Qualities might include the following.

Outstanding problem-solving skills

Do you have the mental agility and intellectual rigour to analyse problems and apply this analysis to develop novel, unexpected solutions?

The problems you face can be large or small, simple or complex, and easy or difficult to solve. Regardless of the nature of the problems, a fundamental part of every trainee lawyer’s role is finding ways to solve them. So, being a confident problem solver will be really important to your success a trainee lawyer.

Much of that confidence comes from having a good process to use when approaching a problem. There are various methodologies which you could use to improve your ‘problem solving’ ability: the ‘Mindtools’ website http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMC_00.htm. With a consistent method, arguably, you can solve problems quickly and effectively. Without one, your solutions may be ineffective, or you’ll get stuck and do nothing, with sometimes painful consequences.

They suggest there are are four basic steps in problem solving:

  • Defining the problem.
  • Generating alternatives.
  • Evaluating and selecting alternatives.
  • Implementing solutions.

Steps 2 to 4 of this process are covered in depth in other areas of Mind Tools. For these, see our sections on Creativity for step 2 (generating alternatives); Decision Making for step 3 (evaluating and selecting alternatives); and Project Management for step 4 (implementing solutions).

Proactive mindset

Are you naturally inquisitive with an openness to new ideas and the initiative to turn them into practical results? Initiative is often misunderstood because it is simply not about meeting performance goals or targets; it’s often about going the extra mile. Initiative may be about identifying a need and championing a solution for the benefit of the law firm, without being asked to do so. Initiative involves a sense of responsibility for the company’s well-being and a few guiding principles. Initiative is about taking steps to make the law firm better, and not about wasting time tackling unimportant matters. To make the distinction, try determining the impact a certain action would make on your team’s performance, the company’s bottom-line or the company’s long-term vision.

An excellent, friendly, article on showing initiative is here, http://uk.askmen.com/money/professional_100/137_professional_life.html.

Commitment to excellence

Do you hold yourself to the highest standards of performance even when the going is tough? And are you passionate about continuously raising and refining your own performance levels? Do you persevere when pursuing a project, but remain flexible if there are obstacles in your way?

Every member of a corporate law firm, it’s felt, must strive to achieve and maintain the highest professional and personal standards, thereby enhancing both the competence and cohesion of that law firm. You might find it helpful to read carefully the Code of Conduct for Solicitors (2007) at this stage, from the Solicitors Regulation Authority: http://www.sra.org.uk/rules/ . It is really important that you make every effort to stay in good physical or mental health for our own health and well-being and also as a personal responsibility towards people you work for/with. It is our responsibility to develop our own and others’ professional understanding of how air corporate law is most effectively applied and how it can remain relevant and capable in contemporary environments.

 

Strong communication and negotiation skills

Can you communicate fluently, clearly and concisely? Persuade and negotiate with others in both group and individual situations? Make complex information understandable to clients? What will you do if you find there are problems with communication?

You may find it interesting to look at the following resources:

Improving negotiation skills for professionals (from the ‘Harvard Negotiation Project’): http://www.pon.harvard.edu/free-reports/

Communication skills: “Law school essentially teaches future lawyers nothing about good communication skills. Here’s what junior lawyers need to know to excel”. http://www.law.com/jsp/nlj/PubArticleNLJ.jsp?id=1202424031318&slreturn=1

Teamwork

Do you have the confidence to collaborate, seek feedback, share ideas and build credibility through your interaction other people?

An excellent overview of the relevance of teamwork to legal reruitment, and beyod, is given on the page: http://www.wikijob.co.uk/wiki/teamwork. Candidates with good teamwork skills are able to see the bigger picture and grasp the concept that employers value the outcome achieved by a group, more than that achieved by any one person.

There is a well-known model of working in groups, which you may be interested in:

http://www.chimaeraconsulting.com/tuckman.htm

Often quoted, Bruce Tuckman’s classic description of the stages of group development is easy to understand and remember, but it helps to go back and look at what’s behind each stage. Tuckman is a respected educational psychologist who first described the (then) four stages of group development in 1965, soon after leaving Princeton.  Looking at the behaviour of small groups in a variety of environments, he recognised the distinct phases they progress through, and suggested they need to experience all four stages before they achieve maximum effectiveness.

Organised, with keen addition-to-detail

Can you manage your own workload, stay organised under pressure, pay attention to detail and be relied on to complete each task accurately and completely?

Corporate law firms need trainees who can handle both the small and large parts of a task. Such individuals won’t overlook what needs to be done and can be depended on to do each task accurately and completely. The following website page from the University of North Caroline offers an useful checklist about what might be included in ‘attention-to-detail’:

http://www.uncg.edu/hrs/detail.htm

For example, the trainee solicitor:

  • Keeps a project checklist, covering all the details that might be overlooked.
  • Checks, and rechecks work for mistakes before sending out.
  • Follows procedures exactly to make sure all parts of a job are completed.
  • Compares finished work to what is expected.
  • Performs routine or repetitious tasks with care and attention.
  • Reviews work carefully for completeness and accuracy.
  • Makes sure equipment is working before it is needed in a project.

Examples of questions for the ‘situational judgement test’

88 individuals took the LegalAware SJT test, and here is a breakdown of the results. This is described in a blogpost on the LegalAware blogpost, http://legal-aware.org/2011/09/legalaware-the-situational-judgment-test-a-test-used-by-clifford-chance-and-eversheds/.

EQ1 You are a trainee. You find that a document summarising the background of a client, which your Managing Associate has prepared and circulated to your group, contains some factual errors about the client. You know the client’s history well as you once did a research project on them at University. You are at a meeting, with your Managing Associate and Partner present. Which of the following courses of action do you take?

Half-way through the group meeting present your own Powerpoint presentation outlining the Managing Associate’s mistakes. (0%)

Have a private word with the Managing Associate early on in the meeting, to ask what he would advise.  (91%)

Immediately seek the attention of the Partner to express your concerns. (9%)

EQ2 It is your first day on a team of a trainees consisting of four people (including yourself). Your Managing Associate has asked your group of trainees to find the relevant cases relating to a transaction you are about to start. He has previously given you a list of the cases. This is an area which you studied in a module at University, and you feel you know it well. What do you decide to do regarding finding the cases?  

Assemble your own list of cases, and obtain case judgments for all of them, and photocopy them. (7%)

Introduce yourself to the other trainees, and discuss with them how they wish to proceed in finding the cases. (90%)

Find your own list of cases, and ask the other trainees to find them for you.  (2%)

EQ3 Your friend, who has always been your competitor at law school, is about to give a Powerpoint presentation on share acquisitions in Korea as a trainee, and you know that the Managing Associate is looking forward to this presentation with interest. However, there appears to be a mechanical fault with accessing Broadband, and the only copy of the file is an email which she sent to you to check yesterday. You saved it on your memory stick, which you happen to have brought to the meeting. You know the memory stick is compatible with the computer she is using for her presentation. How do you decide to proceed?

Pretend you have forgotten the memory stick, and you cannot help. (0%)

Offer to upload the presentation on her computer using the memory stick, but to offer also to download the file from the internet if that fails from a neighbouring computer. (94%)

Ask the Managing Associate for help, to demonstrate that you enjoy teamwork. (6%)

EQ4 You have about sixty documents relating to a financial transaction which you have inherited this morning. It is your first morning in a new seat with five new trainees, and one of your two Managing Associates (the one who was due to meet you) is late for work. What do you first?

Introduce yourself to the other members of your team. (86%)

Phone the other Managing Associate, and insist on him or her being there to lead your business meeting this morning. (1%)

Arrange the documents into five piles of twelve documents, and ask each member of the team to provide details about them for use in an Excel spreadsheet. (13%)

EQ5 You are a trainee, nearly concluding a very important transaction. Your client has asked you to fax to him a copy of a document, but the only person who has a copy of it is your (only) Managing Associate, but he is on holiday in Tenerife and is completely unavailable. All the other members of the team are currently listed as ‘available’ in your head office. Which of the following people would you like to contact first for help?

Another trainee (16%)

An associate (67%)

A partner (17%)

EQ6 You have written a report on private equity in Japan, and you have ten minutes before the deadline, to send it to your supervisor. You are aware that there may be some cases with incorrect citations referenced. Which of the following do you do?

Check thoroughly for spelling and grammar errors. (5%)

Identify urgently the references in an accurate way, and amend your report. (78%)

Ask for an extension (a few hours in addition) so that you can vastly improve your report potentially. (17%)

EQ7 You are close to the final weeks of your first seat in technology in London. Your team is considering proposing a new office in an international jurisdiction to further your commercial interests abroad. The other trainees have asked you to present what you think is the most important aspect of that proposed office, as collectively your Supervisor has asked you to assemble a report on the subject by the end of the week. Which of the following factors do you think might be most important for opening this new office, which you choose to include in your report?

The quality of legal services to be offered by your firm in that particular office. (58%)

The price of legal services to be offered by your firm in that particular office. (4%)

The range of legal services to be offered by your firm in that particular office. (38%)

EQ8 You are a trainee in the corporate finance seat in London where all team members are extremely busy. You have recently been liaising with ten particular clients on an almost daily basis in France. Your Supervisor has asked you to canvass for opinions of various clients in different countries towards the recent fall in stock prices in the European markets. You feel you do not have time to do this task on your own in time. Which of the options do you consider first?

Seek help from other trainees to help you to write the report, and ask other trainees which clients should be contacted. (24%)

Seek help from other trainees to help you to write the report, and contact some or all of the ten clients to ask them for their opinions. (47%)

Research the information which could be obtained from the clients and punctually write a report. (28%)

EQ9 You passed your advanced elective in intellectual property in your Legal Practice Course. You are in a small team of five trainees, and you are all working on an urgent case the preparation of which must be concluded by the close-of-play tomorrow night. Your Managing Associate has asked you to consider where a series of claims in a patent diverges between your client and the party making a claim against your client. She is experienced in intellectual property. You have not looked at the case yet, but already three people think the claims diverge at step 12, but one person thinks the claims diverge at 23. Where the claims diverge is important for your case. Which of the following options do you pursue first?

Analyse the case first to make up your mind about where you think the claims diverge, and discuss further with your team. (93%)

Ask all other members of the team to compile (and email to you) a written report to send to your Managing Associate so that she can decide. (4%)

Ask your Managing Associate to meet up with you urgently to resolve the dispute. (3%)

EQ10 You are a trainee in a law firm, and your best friend is working in a rival firm. You get on well with your Managing Associate, as your firm is reputed to be ‘small but very friendly’. She is very good at keeping secrets, according to your colleagues. Your friend is acting in the team for the opposing client, and has told you informally that it is widely believed in fact that the share acquisition does not fit in with their corporate strategy, despite what is reported in the Financial Times. She has asked you not to tell anyone, but the information could make a critical difference to the success of the transaction of your client. What do you do?

Decide to keep this information confidential, but consider the information as part of your preparatory research, as available from public sources. (58%)

Tell your Managing Associate immediately in private, but request politely that she does not tell anyone. (11%)

Ignore the information, as it could be totally untrustworthy anyway. (31%)

 

  

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Low end disruptive innovation in psychometric testing for students with disabilities

The new ‘Legal Recruit’ site (twitter thread), to launch on 1 November 2011, offers law students a chance to get better at the verbal reasoning test of the sort they might do if they have to a @SHLGROUP test as part of an application for a training contract or vacation scheme placement. The only way to practice these tests properly is to try out the practice assessment which SHL Direct have themselves set.

As a student with a visual impairment myself (I have problems visualising text because of significant diplopia), I wished to design a platform so that students, including students with visual impairments, can easily practice verbal reasoning tests. I’d like law students who are applying through these SHL tests to get good at them. The online practice platform I’ve designed is an example of disruptive technology; I am currently studying innovation management as part of my special electives on my MBA at BPP Business School (as a full-time student).

Disruptive technologies are not always disruptive to customers, and often take a long time before they are significantly disruptive to established companies. I have no intention of making my platform ‘disruptive’ to SHL. In fact, I want students, including people like me with disabilities, to perform well or even shine at these tests when they’re applying for the corporate firms that use them. This unfortunately goes along with the idea popular amongst disabled trainees and disabled seniors that often that you have ‘to be better than the competition’, just to get to play on the “equal playing field”, sad but true, if true.

Disruptive technologies are often difficult to recognise. Indeed, as Professor Clayton Christensen points out and studies have shown (Clayton is Chair in Business Administration at the Harvard Business School, it is often entirely rational for incumbent companies to ignore disruptive innovations, since they can compare so badly with existing technologies or products, and the deceptively small market available for a disruptive innovation is often very small compared to the market for the established technology. SHL is a well-established provider of psychometric tests in the “grown-up world” of legal recruitment; my platform is run to help students who wish to succeed to the best of their ability in an incredibly competitive marketplace.

Disruptive technologies like my psychometric testing platform, too, can be subtly disruptive, rather than prominently so. Previous examples include digital photography (the sharp decline in consumer demand for common 35 mm print film resulting from the popularity of memory cards). In fact, my online assessment platform contains many of the features that work about the SHL verbal reasoning tests (such as a chance to know how much time has elapsed etc.). The subtle disruption I’m introducing is a simple button where you can enlarge the size of text, a simple innovation, but one which can make a huge difference to the wellbeing or happiness of students doing such tests. The point about my test is that the student can now concentrate on getting the answers to the verbal reasoning problems correct, not concentrate on surviving reading the text with enormous difficulty in the time limit.

For example, here’s the sample question for the learner without reasonable adjustments.

Now, here’s the sample question for the learner with reasonable adjustments for visual impairments, in accordance with the Equality Act 2010.

I hope that students with visual impairments, dyslexia or dyspraxia know that they can “ask for reasonable adjustments”. If legal recruiters fail to make such reasonable adjustments on the production of appropriate evidence, they may indeed be acting unlawfully under equality discrimination here in the UK. I believe my innovation is actually a low end disruption.  Arguably, Spotify is an example of a ‘low end disruption’ (see for example here). This is a powerful concept in innovation management, described here for Spotify:

At first, a disruptive product fails to deliver a superior offering to the incumbent technology in one or more characteristics of the job-to-be-done. But consumers switch nonetheless because the disruptor has a systemic advantage in at least one of these characteristics. We gave up minicomputer performance for the cost advantage of PCs, we gave up plasma television contrast for the slimness of the LCD, and we gave up the personality of written letters for the speed of emails.

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Legal Recruit will be observing ‘best practices’ for design of online practice assessments

The ‘Legal Recruit’ twitter thread (@legal_recruit) is already active.

A small secret group has been set up to provide a normal distribution of data from graduates to norm-reference performance of graduates on the new ‘Legal Recruit’ online verbal reasoning tests.

Psychometric tests have become very significant in legal  recruitment. SHL verbal reasoning tests have become widely used in legal recruitment for corporate law firms for London. A lot of weight is given to their results in shortlisting (or not) good candidates for interview for vacation schemes and training contract applications. It is very important that such tests are used responsibly. My ‘Legal Recruit’ will not be seeking official accreditation from the BPS as my tests are not official psychological tests, and are only meant to be used as useful guidance for law students applying to corporate firms merely as practice. The history of the development of these SHL tests by Roger Holdsworth and Peter Saville is interesting, and briefly given in Roger Holdsworth’s obituary in the Telegraph:

“Holdsworth became convinced that psychometric testing could be developed to assist companies in selecting suitable employees. In 1977 he got together with Peter Saville, whom he had met at the British Psychological Society, to found Saville and Holdsworth (later SHL), a business to develop and promote psychometric testing. Psychometric testing took off in the Second World War, when it was used extensively in the armed services to assess personnel, but by the 1960s, when Holdsworth began his career as a business psychologist, it had failed to catch on elsewhere. Most companies recruited staff on the basis of highly subjective interviews or through the “old boy network”. Not only did Holdsworth feel this was unfair, he knew it led to poor decisions. From its beginnings in a spare room, SHL expanded rapidly, profiting from growing demand for the tests from large firms seeking to identify their own “corporate culture” and recruit staff to fit that mould. Drawing on his aptitude for languages – he spoke 5 fluently – Holdsworth led SHL’s expansion into more than 30 countries.”

Psychological tests, by definition, have to test well-understood cognitive domains in a validated, repeatable, consistent, measurable way. ‘Legal Recruit’ tests are not specialised psychological tests, examining specific cognitive domains. They are, however, intended to allow practice for SHL tests which are widely used by corporate law firms.

Indeed, tbe British Psychological Society (“BPS”) has a register of accreditated tests, which contains some SHL tests. According to the official website of the BPS devoted to psychometric testing,

“Test Registration has been developed to inform and protect the public by the use of ‘quality marks’ on tests that meet the European Federation of Psychologists Association (EFPA) criteria to be classed as having adequate psychological properties. Tests can be registered if they meet minimum quality standards. The quality standards are set by the European Federation of Psychologists Associations and the tests are assessed against the standard through the review process.”

The British Psychological Society maintain standards for psychological testing: according to their website, “Psychological tests are used in all walks of life to assess ability, personality and behaviour. A test can be used as part of the selection process for job interviews, to assess children in schools, assess people with mental health issues or offenders in prisons. The British Psychological Society’s Psychological Testing Centre (PTC) is the first point of contact for anyone who uses, takes or develops tests.. “

I have a deep interest in cognitive neuropsychology, as my PhD from Cambridge and my post-doctoral fellowship from London were in this discipline (particularly the role of the frontal lobes in reasoning, planning and decision-making), As I am disabled with visual impairment, I will ensure that my tests can be done by learners with visual impairments; and all other reasonable adjustments are provided. Whilst the Legal Recruit tests will not be officially accreditated by the BPS, they will all be observing best practice. Some critical documents in best practice by the BPS are provided here,

A test taker’s guide

The code of good practice in psychological testing

Draft Data Protection and Privacy Issues in Employment Related Settings

The BPS also draws attention to the disability issues, in keeping with the corporate law firms’ obligations with the Equality Act (2010):

Dyslexia and Occupational Testing

Visual Impairment and Psychological Testing.pdf

Psychometric Testing for people with a hearing impairment1.pdf

The BPS draw attention also to ‘good practice’ guidelines over computerised testing. ‘Legal Recruit’ will be adhering to these guidelines:

 International Guidelines on Computer-Based and Internet Delivered Tests

Using online assessment tools for recruitment.pdf

Guidelines on the Validity of Graphology in Personnel Assessment

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‘Legal Recruit’ verbal reasoning tests; reasonable adjustments

I feel strongly that disabled candidates (candidates with both ‘seen visibilities’ and ‘unseen visibilities’) should also be able to practice  online verbal reasoning tests in preparation for online verbal reasoning tests almost ubiquitously used in legal recruitment for the purpose of shortlisting purposes for training contacts or vacation schemes.

The display on the online test will in fact look different to this.

This is because we will be, for the first time to our knowledge, have a special icon which people with visual impairment like me  can press to enlarge the text. Note also it will be possible to practice the test under the total time you prefer due to any reasonable adjustments – you can enter this total time. This, again, to our knowledge, is unique to us.

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